The Business of Beauty Haul of Fame: La Vie en Rosé



Welcome back to Haul of Fame, the weekly beauty roundup of new products, new ideas and yet another reminder that deep conditioner is Mary Magdalene’s ointment of 2024.

Included in today’s issue: Beachwaver, Byredo, Ciaté London, Charlotte Tilbury, Curie, Davines, L’Oréal, Loewe, Make Beauty, Maybelline, Michael Cera, Miu Miu, Ouai, Rhode, Tonymoly, Typology and pineapples. But first…

I think we have to talk about pink hair — but not because of Kylie Jenner.

Yes, the beauty mogul debuted a shock of cotton candy hair on Jan. 16, sparking online coverage from TMZ to Vogue. But Jenner’s pink strands barely lasted a week, and at the Paris couture shows, Kylie appeared with her natural chocolate brown colour. (Are we calling it Espresso Martini? Let’s.)

Meanwhile, women with less followers but more underground cred have emerged with paler, more frayed examples. Redken’s classic Rose Quartz hair colour is still a Pinterest staple, thanks to its moodboard-worthy vibes. Anok Yai appeared on the December cover of Dazed in ghostly pink Prada, with powdered hair to match. Japanese DJ Yamato Inoue has been rolling up to Louis Vuitton and Balmain shows in a shaggy bubblegum ‘do. In Barcelona, a digital “model” named Aitana was given pink hair by an AI algorithm, and now fronts European hair brand Llongueras. She’s also been tagging Olaplex in her posts, which is wild, because again: “She” is a digital computer image and not a human being with hair!

Then there’s Dakota Fanning’s new Marc Jacobs campaign, which features the actress with faded pink locks. (Starting in late December, the brand also sold Bleach London’s pink hair dye on its Heaven by Marc Jacobs website; stock disappeared in about a week.) Fanning’s look was created by Holli Smith, the hair artist behind Taylor Swift’s tousled Time Magazine locks and Simone Rocha’s recent couture debut for Jean Paul Gaultier, where stylist Tina Leung and critic Kristin Bateman sat front row with pink hair. And that’s what might be key, here.

Simone Rocha is, after all, the Mother of Bows, and the reason millions of TikTok faces are now augmented with ribbon makeup that unfurls down their cheeks. Thanks to very real threats to girlhood’s safety (abortion bans, school shootings, wage gaps, wars) and cultural debates on girlhood’s value (Greta Gerwig’s gutting Oscar snub, “Mean Girls: The Musical,” Sephora tweens), everything pink and pretty is suddenly an anxious symbol. Bows used to subvert that anxiety, but now they’re so mainstream, we need a new way to laud and repackage the quiet freedom of soft power. Pink hair might be it, even though it requires a fairly violent bleaching process to make it perfect. Of course, girlhood is rife with emotional violence, so a little rip and tear in the physical realm seems only fair if we want to truly commit to the bit.

WHAT ELSE IS NEW

COSMETICS

Zoe Deutch is the new face of Maybelline’s Sky High Mascara, while Kendall Jenner’s campaign for L’Oréal’s Voluminous Panorama Mascara is now rolling into drugstore carousels nationwide. Both campaigns, and women, are luminous, but I fear a mascara arms race is imminent. Now that Covid cases are on the rise, eye makeup will once again replace lip colour as the on-the-go choice for girls in a rush. (My glide-or-die pick is still Smashbox, at least until Marc Jacobs Beauty brings their spider tube back.)

Make Beauty dropped their Multi-Chromatic Metal Reflecting Eye Shadows on Jan. 23. This is a very long name, but I’ll allow it, because founder Carrie Barber’s smokey eye tutorial with the product is very good. Barber was an art director for Glossier, and Violet Grey before doing her own thing, and her cool-girl-gaze is really propelling the brand beyond a corny glitter moment.

On Jan. 23, Charlotte Tilbury revealed her Hollywood Beauty Icons lipstick. The campaign stars Kate Moss, Jourdan Dunn and Michaela Jaé Rodriguez, which is kind of a hoot since Moss and Dunn are fashion industry-shaping queens, but Hollywood icons? Eh. “Pose” ingénue Rodriguez, however, is a very interesting choice. She’ll soon star in a thriller called “Skincare,” which will hopefully have some witty sponcon attached. (Tilbury’s Magic Cream, perhaps?)

Byredo also launched lipsticks this week, with their Liquid Lipstick Matte hitting shelves on Jan. 25. The campaign was shot by BoF 500 member Zoë Ghertner and features smeared red lipstick across a clear lens.

SKINCARE

Michael Cera is the new face of CeraVe, which is kind of brilliant considering the double win of nameplay and genetics. Cera is 35 but still looks like a grad student; a welcome quality for any skincare spokes-dude. (Owen Wilson is also a beauty bro now, thanks to his “Chief Shampoo Officer” title for California Naturals. I’m good on haircare, but call me when he launches pot.)

On Jan. 23, Ciaté London revealed their Vitamin Boost Plumping Primer. The line’s imagery includes older models, which should be standard for products created for skin that has lived!

Fount Society released an oil cleanser on Jan. 22 with sea buckthorn and papaya. The brand says it helps “detoxify skin,” which is great language for women who spent their 20s downing $20 green juice, and now, in their 40s, can afford $48 soap instead.

Typology introduced a Smoothing Eye Set on Jan. 22 that includes a mask and silicone patches. It says the effect is “a fresh eye contour,” which would indeed be remarkable. Taking contouring beyond the visual effects of makeup into the physical realm of skincare is, really, something that happens with surgery and not topicals. But hey, technology changes!

Curie debuted their Warm Vanilla deodorant and body spray on Jan. 17, after testing it with a “sniff club,” a group of brand fans who volunteered to give early feedback on the scent. This seems fun for budding beauty influencer types.

Tonymoly expanded their Wonder Ceramide Mochi range with eye patches, a cleanser, and a water cream on Jan. 25. The collection is adorned with anime smiley faces, so, of course, I will buy them.

HAIR CARE … OR IS IT FRAGRANCE?

Davines launched This is a Dry Wax Finishing Spray on Jan. 24. The texturiser promises a flexible hold, and comes with its own fragrance grid: “Vanilla and vetiver base notes mixed beautifully with notes of sweet orange blossom, soft florals and powdery heliotropes.” Pre-Ouai, it would be surprising that a hair product would lean so far into its scent profile. But Jen Atkin’s signature sniffs really changed that game, as evidenced by Beachwaver. On Jan. 21, the brand famous for its curling irons introduced its first-ever fragrance trio: Polynesian Pink Sugar, Bondi Beach Day and Bali Beach Night. Let’s see where this trend goes.

On Jan. 23, Loewe released Solo Vulcan and Agua Drop eau de parfums. Both are infused with the Loewe Accord, “a unique new note based on Labdanum, the aromatic oil that is extracted from the rockrose (cistus ladanifer), a wildflower that’s native to Spain’s rocky, rural terrain.” These fragrances will sell out regardless, because: Loewe. But it’s nice to see the label honour its Spanish heritage through fragrance, even as creative director Jonathan Anderson brings a decidedly London eye to the whole glorious enterprise.

Miu Miu’s doing this cute thing where it has introduced mix-and-match fragrance bottles, so you can spray your new (Jan. 22) Lost in Grace scent from your own little fashion doodad. Also: The brand’s fragrance model looks so much like Julia Stiles, I, now, demand Julia Stiles also model for Miu Miu. “10 Things I Hate About You” turns 25 this year, after all. (Please do not make it a Broadway musical.)

AND FINALLY…

Rhode’s new cleanser has such loud buzz, I even got a press release from the jewellery label Notte letting me know their earrings were featured in the beauty brand’s Instagram campaign. In photos, they’re overshadowed by a gigantic tube of Rhode Pineapple Refresh, but okay. Cute.





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